The Oath has been awakened – painting


In painting this one, I was facing the challenge to have a lot of reds, even in the sky, and horses – which sometimes leads to dangerously girly-calendary motifs.

So far, I seem to have succeeded in not falling over on that side of the fence. I know that because my daughter, a great fan of horses and pink, keeps looking at the picture on my desk and walking away without saying a word. That’s her way of saying, “Really, mum, such lovely horseys, and such ugly colours. I’d tell you so but I’m afraid of hurting your feelings.”


Note: The colours on the photographs deviate really far from the actual ones at times. When I used the flash, they’re too yellow; when I didn’t, my daylight lamp resulted in too bluish tones. The entire pic is too large to be properly photographed with the means I have.

The lineart is, again, pencil, scanned, tinted and photocopied onto watercolour paper. See here if you have any questions.

My daughter would have loved the first stage. I overlaid the whole pic with a warm light red wash composed of Madder red and Ochre, dabbing some paint off the horses and figures, particularly the upper parts, allowing all those twenty-eight horse legs to blend into the rest.


Then, I added streaks of more red into the sky, and blotches of Chromoxide Green, Madder red mixed with Ultramarine, and Burnt Sienna into the ground, for the colours of heather.


Next, some Ochre, Sepia, but my violet mix from above for the stones. Later, they’ll be lighter than the rest.


Next, I proceed to paint more heather. I mix more Madder Red with Ultramarine, and paint the upper edges of patches of heather…


While the paint is still wet, I rinse my brush in the orange-y dirty water in my water container, and drag the paint down with it. The jagged top edge remains unaffected, the rest…


… is blurred and diluted.


Patches of heather:


I proceed to muddy the sky (and frustrate my daughter), and add a dirty wash of Burnt Sienna and Ochre to the top margin of the painting, drawing it down with more dirty water.


The ground now gets a second wash of my violet mix with Burnt Sienna, darkening it and softening the edges of heather.


I allow it to bleed into the horses’ legs, to merge them with the ground. A while ago, I used to cleanly separate every element of the image, and sometimes, that would result in cut-and-paste looking picture elements.


This is a sort of middle stage, from which I can start to add layers. It’s also the sort of stage that’s already starting to look good, and which I can safely leave on my desk without cringing whenever I walk past it…


After a good night’s sleep, I decide that the ground is too light, and add another darker layer, effectively killing my detailed heather. Which isn’t so bad. It’s still there in a blurry way, and will look very organic when I’m done.


Now, for the sky. I rewet the upper portion of the picture, mix some dramatic dark violet (with Madder Red, Ultramarine, Indigo, Sepia, and Burnt Sienna) and paint streaks into the wet areas, allowing them to run.


The ground is dry at this point, and I start to paint the orange shrubbery around the stones. For this, I use gouache – watercolour wouldn’t have been visible. I also redo my heather in the same way I did above.


I then add some highlights, again with gouache, to the shrubs and stones, and paint a few stray patches of wild wheat.


Then I go as daring as I get and use green to paint the sallow thorn and the far hills, adding a few berries into the branches.


Now, finally, the figures. I start with some reds and ochres to see how it looks. Yup – looks good!


I paint the figures and horses with a fair deal of island hopping, working on whatever spot begs my attention (and is dry), mostly sticking to one colour at a time, more or less.


More detailing.


Just to show you how small some of the bits and pieces here are… The entire piece is 65 x 32 cm. … That’s one cent, btw.


Some final touches with white gouache to spearpoints, hair, fur.


Finished piece and detail shots:


12 thoughts on “The Oath has been awakened – painting

  1. oh wow, this is going to be brilliant! I really love it, I’m almost expecting them all to come riding out of the frame and charge through my classroom

  2. Love watching your process. Can you please tell me what type of ink/pen you use? All the inks I’ve tried have smeared with watercolor painted over it. I’m frustrated with buying pens that smear! :(

  3. When I saw the line art, I was excited. When I realized it was going to be colored in sickly reds, I got really excited. I can’t wait to see how this turns out.

  4. Love, love, LOVE THIS! It is becoming more and more wondrous! I am really amazed from the degree of detail that you managed to put in there! The horses, especially, capture my attention, and the palette used is really perfect – daring, but perfect. Would you be offended if I say that this one makes me think of some sort of Biblical location? I know the botanical data put it in a thoroughly different location, but – it’s just the overall mood, I think. If you manage to get it even better, I would be really amazed *bows*

  5. Pingback: The Oath has been awakened… « Jenny's Sketchbook

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s